360° Coverage : Babies slow to gain weight catch up by teens

Babies slow to gain weight catch up by teens

London, Feb 25 (IANS) Most babies slow in gaining weight within the first nine months catch up by the age of 13, but remain lighter and shorter than their peers, a new study has found.

Feb 25 2013, 2:50am CST | by

London, Feb 25 — Most babies slow in gaining weight within the first nine months catch up by the age of 13, but remain lighter and shorter than their peers, a new study has found.

The University of Bristol study is based on data from 11,499 participants, providing the most conclusive and reassuring evidence for parents that, given the right care, many infants who lag in weight gain catch up by teenage.

Alan Emond, professor at Bristol, who led the study, explains: "The reason the early group caught up more quickly may be because those infants had obvious feeding difficulties and were more readily identified at the eight-week check, resulting in early treatment leading to a more rapid recovery, the journal Paediatrics reports.

"Those children who showed slow weight gain later in infancy took longer to recover, because of the longer period of slow growth and because their parents were smaller and lighter too," adds Emond, according to a Bristol statement.

The study found that, of the 11,499 infants born at term, 507 were slow to put on weight before the age of eight weeks (early group) and 480 were slow to gain weight between eight weeks and nine months (late group).

Thirty children were common to both groups.

The infants in the early group recovered quickly and had almost caught up in weight by the age of two, whereas those in the later group gained weight slowly until the age of seven, then had a 'spurt' between seven and 10 years, but remained considerably shorter and lighter than their peers and those in the early group at the age of 13.

At that age, children in the later group were on average 5.5 kg lighter and almost four cm shorter than their peers; those in the early group were on average 2.5 kg lighter and 3.25 cm shorter than their peers, according to a Bristol statement.

Slow weight gain is often seen by parents and some healthcare professionals as a sign of underlying ill health. Clinicians face a dilemma between taking steps to increase a child's energy intake and putting them at risk of obesity later in life by encouraging too rapid weight gain.

IANS

Source: IANS

 
 
 

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/8" rel="author">Luigi Lugmayr</a>
Luigi is the founding Chief Editor of I4U News and brings over 15 years experience in the technology field to the ever evolving and exciting world of gadgets. He started I4U News back in 2000 and evolved it into vibrant technology magazine.
Luigi can be contacted directly at ml@i4u.com. Luigi posts regularly on LuigiMe.com about his experience running I4U.

 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Latest stories

Apple steps up to help earthquake victims in Nepal
Apple steps up to help earthquake victims in Nepal
iTunes Store has link for people to donate for cause
 
 
Apple set to release quarterly earnings on Monday
Apple set to release quarterly earnings on Monday
Company hopes for big numbers with the recent release of the Apple Watch
 
 
Apple Watch Sport Receives 5 out of 10 Points from iFixit
Apple Watch Sport Receives 5 out of 10 Points from iFixit
The iFixit engineers award the new Apple Watch with only 5 out of 10 points
 
 
Robert Downey, Jr. speaks out about the Apple Watch
Robert Downey, Jr. speaks out about the Apple Watch
Actor says that he has mixed reviews about the smartwatch