360° Coverage : Siberian thaw likely to worsen global warming

1 Updates
Siberian thaw likely to worsen global warming
Photo Credit: MARWAN NAAMANI, Getty Images

Siberian thaw likely to worsen global warming

Feb 22 2013, 3:40am CST | by

London, Feb 22 (IANS) A rise of 1.5 degrees Celsius in mercury is likely to melt the permanently frozen ground over a large chunk of Siberia, possibly releasing gigatonnes of carbon from soils that could aggravate global warming, says a study.

London, Feb 22 — A rise of 1.5 degrees Celsius in mercury is likely to melt the permanently frozen ground over a large chunk of Siberia, possibly releasing gigatonnes of carbon from soils that could...

Filed under: news

YouTube Videos

 
 
 

1 year ago

Siberian thaw likely to worsen global warming

Feb 22 2013, 3:40am CST | by

London, Feb 22 (IANS) A rise of 1.5 degrees Celsius in mercury is likely to melt the permanently frozen ground over a large chunk of Siberia, possibly releasing gigatonnes of carbon from soils that could aggravate global warming, says a study.

London, Feb 22 — A rise of 1.5 degrees Celsius in mercury is likely to melt the permanently frozen ground over a large chunk of Siberia, possibly releasing gigatonnes of carbon from soils that could aggravate global warming, says a study.

"As permafrost covers 24 percent of the land surface of the northern hemisphere, significant thawing could affect vast areas and release gigatonnes of carbon," said Anton Vaks from the Oxford department of earth sciences, who led the research.

"For instance, natural gas facilities in the region, as well as power lines, roads, railways and buildings are all built on permafrost and are vulnerable to thawing. Such a thaw could damage this infrastructure with obvious economic implications," adds Vaks, the journal Science Express reports.

The data comes from a team of researchers from Britain, Russia, Mongolia and Switzerland studying stalactites and stalagmites from caves located along the "permafrost frontier", where ground begins to be permanently frozen in a layer tens to hundreds of metres thick, according to an Oxford statement.

"The stalactites and stalagmites from these caves are a way of looking back in time to see the effects of warm periods similar to our modern climate," says Vaks.

Because stalactites and stalagmites only grow when liquid rainwater and snow melt drips into the caves, these formations record 500,000 years of changing permafrost conditions, including warmer periods similar to the climate today.

Records from a particularly warm period around 400,000 years ago suggest that global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius compared to the present is enough to cause substantial thawing of permafrost far north from its present-day southern limit.

The team used radiometric dating techniques to date the growth of cave formations (stalactites and stalagmites).

Data from the Ledyanaya Lenskaya Cave - near Russia's Lensk town - in the coldest region showed that the only period when stalactite growth took place occurred about 400,000 years ago, during a period with a global temperature 1.5 degrees higher than today.

IANS

Source: IANS

 

Don't miss ...

 

<a href="/latest_stories/all/all/8" rel="author">Luigi Lugmayr</a>
Luigi is the founding Chief Editor of I4U News and brings over 15 years experience in the technology field to the ever evolving and exciting world of gadgets. He started I4U News back in 2000 and evolved it into vibrant technology magazine.
Luigi can be contacted directly at ml@i4u.com. Luigi posts regularly on LuigiMe.com about his experience running I4U.

 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Latest stories

Asian monsoon much older than previously thought
Washington, Sep 15 (IANS) The Asian monsoon came into existence 40 million years ago during a period of high atmospheric carbon dioxide and warmer temperatures, reports an international research team.
 
 
Mild hyper-tension can be treated without drugs
London, Sep 15 (IANS) For people with mild hyper-tension, encouraging lifestyle changes should be the first line of recommendations for physicians rather than putting them on drugs, suggest experts.
 
 
How genes keep body clock in proper rhythm
Washington, Sep 15 (IANS) Sixteen years after scientists found the genes that control the circadian clock in all cells, US researchers have now discovered how genes keep the circadian clocks in all human cells in time and in proper rhythm within the 24-hour period.
 
 
First comet landing site to be revealed
Paris, Sep 15 (IANS/EFE) The European Space Agency (ESA) has planned to reveal the site selected for the first landing of a comet this week.
 
 
 

Latest from the Network

Mild hyper-tension can be treated without drugs
London, Sep 15 (IANS) For people with mild hyper-tension, encouraging lifestyle changes should be the first line of recommendations for physicians rather than putting them on drugs, suggest experts. Lead researcher...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Amy Winehouse statue unveiled in London
London, Sep 15 (IANS) A life-size bronze statue of late singer Amy Winehouse was unveiled in Camden town neighborhood in north London on the occasion of her 31st birth anniversary. Winehouse's parents, Mitch and Janis...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Kerry Katona says 'I do' for third time
London, Sep 15 (IANS) Singer Kerry Katona tied the knot for the third time, and this time with former rugby player George Kay near Bristol. Katona's best friend Katie Price was a bridesmaid at the nuptials held Sunday...
Read more on Celebrity Balla
 
Fijians safe from Ebola virus: Health ministry
Suva, Sep 15 (IANS) Fiji's health ministry has ruled out any possibility of Ebola outbreak in the island-country because of its geographical location and lack of any direct global trade with West Africa, media reported...
Read more on Business Balla
 
Liam Neeson says action heroes don't have to be young
Liam Neeson says action movie roles are now for older actors too. The 'A Walk Among the Tombstones' star has become a fixture in adrenaline-fuelled blockbusters like 'Taken', and while he think it isn't something for ''...
Read more on Movie Balla
 
Bond 24 to begin filming in December
Filming for the new James Bond film is to begin in December. Den of Geek reports that shooting for the eagerly-awaited new flick will start on December 6, 2014, with the star-studded cast set to get together at Pinewood...
Read more on Movie Balla
 
Two more MH17 victims identified
Kuala Lumpur, Sep 15 (IANS) The remains of two more victims aboard the Malaysian Airlines MH17, that was shot down over Ukraine, have been identified, authorities said Monday. All remains of the 15 crew members of the...
Read more on Politics Balla
 
How genes keep body clock in proper rhythm
Washington, Sep 15 (IANS) Sixteen years after scientists found the genes that control the circadian clock in all cells, US researchers have now discovered how genes keep the circadian clocks in all human cells in time...
Read more on Apple Balla
 
Afghanistan arrive in Perth for ICC World Cup preparation
Perth, Sep 15 (IANS) The Afghanistan team arrived here Monday to launch the final stages of their preparation for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015, which will be played in Australia and New Zealand from Feb 14 to March...
Read more on Sport Balla
 
Tabuena to be patient in quest for Asian Tour win
Selangor (Malaysia), Sep 15 (IANS) Patience will remain a virtue for Filipino teenager Miguel Tabuena as he turns his focus on this week's Worldwide Holdings Selangor Masters. The 19-year-old narrowly missed out on...
Read more on Sport Balla